“The Spirit Speaks”: SBL and Print Updates

If you’ll be visiting sunny San Diego (a huge improvement from blustery Baltimore, I expect) later this month for SBL, consider yourself invited to what I expect will be a very interesting session on “Spirit and Bible: The Development of Early Accounts of the Spirit in the Christian Scriptures.” I’m certainly looking forward to presenting alongside such a distinguished group of scholars. Here’s the details:

Screen Shot 2014-11-03 at 4.32.02 PM

Finally, I’m pleased to share the news that the full-length version of this project is scheduled to appear some time in 2015 in the journal Vigiliae Christianae. Here’s the abstract:

This paper considers the role of the Spirit within early Christian writers’ use of prosopological exegesis, an interpretive method which seeks to identify various persons (prosopa) as the “true” speakers or addressees of a Scriptural text in which they are otherwise not in view. While scholars are increasingly recognizing that, for some early Christian writers, the Spirit could himself be a speaking agent, there remains no systematic analysis of the texts in which the Spirit speaks from his own prosopon. After making just such an analysis, focusing on key texts in the writings of Tertullian and Justin Martyr, this paper concludes that the need for divine testimony concerning both the Father and the Son was the central motivating factor for assigning OT quotations to the prosopon of the Spirit. In particular, this paper argues that this emphasis on the Spirit’s role as one who testifies is a direct outgrowth of the portrayal of the Spirit in the Johannine corpus, and arose in the context of conflict with Judaism concerning the cessation of the Spirit. By making this connection, we have a new means by which to glimpse the theological dynamics at work in the pre-Nicene period that would contribute to the development of a distinctively Trinitarian, and not merely binitarian, view of God.

 

Advertisements

About krhughes14

Smyrna, Georgia
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to “The Spirit Speaks”: SBL and Print Updates

  1. The Holy Spirit in the New Covenant is predominately contributed to the Father. in multiple instances in the New Covenant, it records that the “spirit of the Lord” came or was on them or was moving. In 100% of the cases where this phrase is written in the Old Covenant Hebrew, it is actually “spirit of Y’howah” attributing the Spirit to the Father. While the New Covenant Greek was obviously copied from the Old Covenant Greek “spirit of the Lord,” it is clear that the thought (spirit) behind the writing was in Hebrew and therefore “the Spirit of Lord” should be “the spirit of Y’howah.”

    In only 2 cases in the New Covenant, the Holy Spirit is attributed to the Son with the phrase the “spirit of Christ.” But we can see in the prophets that the root of Jesse and the son of David, was was Yeshua on earth, inherited the Father’s name of Y’howah as well (Hebrews 1, John 17:11-12) especially in the future when he performs the work of the Anointed One (Christ, Messiah, King) as Jeremiah 23:5-6 records.

    The other cases in the New Covenant, the Holy Spirit is referred to as “Holy Spirit” which is not a new term but was actually present for quite some time and even recorded in the Psalms. The “Holy Spirit” is a term directly attributed to the Father’s spirit.

    The development of the Trinity didn’t happen overnight but took at least 200 years to do so. The writings of Justin Martyr, though he did die for his faith, should be read with the greatest skepticism in that he avidly rejects the commandments of God (Sabbaths, holy days, cleanliness) which his contemporaries (such as bishop Polycarp, disciple of Apostle John) still observed and advocated.

  2. Reblogged this on YHWH Messiah and commented:
    TRINITY: Father Son Spirit

    The Holy Spirit in the New Covenant is predominately contributed to the Father. in multiple instances in the New Covenant, it records that the “spirit of the Lord” came or was on them or was moving. In 100% of the cases where this phrase is written in the Old Covenant Hebrew, it is actually “spirit of Y’howah” attributing the Spirit to the Father. While the New Covenant Greek was obviously copied from the Old Covenant Greek “spirit of the Lord,” it is clear that the thought (spirit) behind the writing was in Hebrew and therefore “the Spirit of Lord” should be “the spirit of Y’howah.”

    In only 2 cases in the New Covenant, the Holy Spirit is attributed to the Son with the phrase the “spirit of Christ.” But we can see in the prophets that the root of Jesse and the son of David, was was Yeshua on earth, inherited the Father’s name of Y’howah as well (Hebrews 1, John 17:11-12) especially in the future when he performs the work of the Anointed One (Christ, Messiah, King) as Jeremiah 23:5-6 records.

    The other cases in the New Covenant, the Holy Spirit is referred to as “Holy Spirit” which is not a new term but was actually present for quite some time and even recorded in the Psalms. The “Holy Spirit” is a term directly attributed to the Father’s spirit.

    The development of the Trinity didn’t happen overnight but took at least 200 years to do so. The writings of Justin Martyr, though he did die for his faith, should be read with the greatest skepticism in that he avidly rejects the commandments of God (Sabbaths, holy days, cleanliness) which his contemporaries (such as bishop Polycarp, disciple of Apostle John) still observed and advocated.

    https://taarcheia.wordpress.com/2014/11/06/the-spirit-speaks-sbl-and-print-updates/comment-page-1/#comment-299

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s